ChildCare Education Institute August Newsletter
Creating Foundations in Communication 
In This Issue...
Creating Foundations in Communication
Supporting Your Child's Communication Skills
How Texting Changes Communication
CCEI's National Accreditation is Renewed
Early Childhood Online Training Offers Language and Problem Solving Skills
Annual Training Subscriptions - Individual + Center-Based Options
CDA, Director, & Early Childhood Credential Coursework

Creating Foundations in Communication       

 

In many ways, communication skills really present the ultimate product of a child's early learning experiences and upbringing. Language skills, emotional regulation, self-awareness, self-confidence, and social skills all play an important role in communication. Therefore, to promote good overall communication skills, early childhood professionals need to take an "all of the above" approach. Fortunately, educators have access to a wide array of resources to promote good communication skills (including links in this newsletter and many related courses available through the CCEI professional development library). In fact, at its core, the majority of everything we do and say in the early childhood environment is really intended to promote development of communication skills.  

 

The process takes years, with many stages and steps along the way, and in every classroom, children bring a wide range of difference skills and experiences. However, there is at least one thing every teacher can do to help every child, regardless of his or her individual level or stage of development: Emphasize Appropriate Eye Contact and Body Language!

 

Fair or not, inappropriate body language can have a huge impact on a person's future. As busy social creatures, we humans rely on our brains to make snap-judgments about other people. Our brains don't have time to analyze and reflect on every other person's background, feelings, and motivations. Sure, fair and reasonable people know that it takes time to really get to know a person, but you really cannot overstate the importance of that first impression. And all the fancy words and emotional control will mean little or nothing if a child does not make eye contact and actually LISTEN to other people.  

 

Teachers, coaches, and employers interact with lots of people during the day, and they quickly form impressions of others based on their initial body language and eye contact. Failing to make eye contact will not doom a child's future, but unfortunately it can have a pretty big impact, not only in school and work but also in personal relationships.

 

Children need to understand that eye contact is absolutely essential and expected in the adult world. In other words, adults are expected to make eye contact during conversation. Eye contact is easier for some people than for others, and that is fine, but adults should know that when they first meet someone else, or in any situation in which they ought to show a level of respect and sensitivity, it is imperative to make eye contact, to acknowledge the speaker, and to respond in an appropriately loud, clear voice. Looking away and mumbling is NOT a recommended strategy for winning friends and influencing people!

 

The goal is simple: make eye contact, show that you are listening, and respond accordingly. Still, for most of us, these things require practice and reinforcement. Teachers should do the following:

  • Always be a role model. Children are observers. They learn by watching adults. They watch you when you are talking to other adults as well as when you are talking to other children. They will notice if their teacher is always careful to make sincere eye contact.
  • Don't be afraid to correct them! Imagine that you happen to observe a child from your class interacting with a parent or another teacher during the day. You see that the child looks away and shrugs shyly. Do not publically chastise the child or take any punitive action whatsoever. However, you will be doing the child a big favor if you say, in a positive, friendly yet firm way, that they should remember to make eye contact next time.
  • Engage in role play! This is a fun, non-judgmental way to teach good communication skills. Role play is a good way to approach all sorts of challenging social and emotional issues, but it is also a good way to practice old-fashioned active listening and other communication skills. You don't have to play out everyday situations in order for role play to be effective. Children can role-play the parts of characters from stories or just do silly skits. The most important thing is that each participant plays the role of a good communicator!

As educators and parents, we spend years trying to help children build the foundational skills they need in order to become competent, confident communicators. We do this because we understand that good communication skills can make the difference between success and failure (or happiness and frustration) in our personal and professional lives. Loving, stable personal relations and productive, trusting professional relations are all dependent on good verbal communication.

Volume 9, Issue 8

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Supporting Your Child's Communication Skills

The capacity to communicate is the ability and desire to connect with others by exchanging ideas and feelings, both verbally and non-verbally.  Most children learn to communicate to get a need met or to establish and maintain interaction with a loved adult.

Babies communicate from birth, through sounds (crying, cooing, squealing), facial expressions (eye contact, smiling, grimacing) and gestures/body movements (moving legs in excitement or distress, and later, gestures like pointing.) Babies continue to develop communication skills when adults respond to their efforts to "tell" others about what they need or want.

 

View Article

Article Courtesy of ZeroToThree.org
How Texting Changes Communication
By: Zawn Villines
 

Texting encourages rapid-fire, single-sentence thoughts, but this style of communication isn't conducive to face-to-face communication. Consequently, people who text a lot may be more uncomfortable with in-person communication and may even use their cell phones to communicate with people who are in their presence.  

 

 

View Article

Article Courtesy of GoodTherapy.org


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CCEI's National Accreditation is Renewed    
      
ChildCare Education Institute is proud to announce it has been awarded renewal of accreditation by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC), a U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) recognized accrediting agency.


Following a comprehensive evaluation of CCEI and its programs, which included an extensive Self Evaluation Report, feedback from the Examining Committee's on-site visit, and evaluation of CCEI's curriculum by Subject Matter Experts, the Accrediting Commission of the DETC awarded CCEI a renewal of accreditation without conditions for a five-year period. CCEI was found to meet or exceed the Commission's standards for accreditation.

Early Childhood Online Training Offers Language and Problem Solving Skills    
      
CCEI offers CHD101: Promoting Speaking and Listening Skills as an online no-cost trial child care training course to new CCEI users during the month of August.

Literacy experts have determined that one of the most effective ways to increase school readiness is to improve children's speaking and listening skills, which are the basic building blocks of literacy and future academic achievement. This course emphasizes the central role of speaking and listening skills in the development of communication and early literacy skills.  

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Individual Professional Development Subscriptions for only $99 per year!  
CCEI offers over 100 IACET CEU-awarded online child care training courses that meet continuing education requirements. CCEI has professional development offerings in English and Spanish, and courses are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year from any computer with Internet access.
 
Center-Based Subscriptions 
Center-Based Subscriptions are a great way for directors to manage and administer continuing education for staff members. CCEI's Center-Based Subscriptions, available for small and large centers, allow directors to provide training for as little as $20 per teacher for the entire year!
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Online CDA Coursework
CCEI's Online CDA Certificate programs of study meet the clock-hour training requirement of The Council for Professional Recognition, which is needed in order to apply for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. CCEI's CDA Certificate programs focus on the six CDA Competency Goals established by The Council and contain the required hours in each of the eight specified content areas.

Online Director Programs
CCEI offers several online programs for directors including the Online Director's Certificate and
Director's Certificate Renewal, Georgia Director's Certificate, Texas Director's Certificate and Texas Director's Certificate Renewal, and Florida Director's Certificate Renewal. These programs provide the professional development required for early childhood professionals seeking to further their skills and knowledge in the management of a child care center. Each student receives support from an Education Coach (EC) and CCEI's Customer Support Help Desk.

CCEI Early Childhood Credential

The CCEI Early Childhood Credential (ECC) is designed to give a basic framework of early childhood theory and application through online content-based coursework, reading assignments, practical application exercises, essays, parent interviews, classroom observation and oral and written exams. The instructional units and the 180 hours of coursework cover major topics in early childhood education including the Principles of Child Growth and Development; Safe, Healthy Environments; Social and Emotional Development; Motor, Language, and Cognitive Development; Principles of Child Assessment; Program Management, Families, and Professionalism. The credential awards 18 IACET CEUs, and is recognized by NAEYC to meet a part of the Alternative Pathways for directors to achieve educational qualifications. The ECC is a clear pathway toward higher education and raising the knowledge and skills of the early education workforce. Holders of the CCEI Early Childhood Credential can be considered qualified for Head Start positions that require a minimum of a CDA or other certificate. Graduates of CCEI's Early Childhood Credential (ECC) will have met all training, portfolio, and observation requirements of the national CDA Credential and only need to complete the Council's exam at a PearsonVue testing center to finalize the CDA Credential application process.The ECC is an expanded program that incorporates the other CDA required elements such as the formal observation and portfolio creation.

 

CCEI coursework is eligible for college credit through articulation with one of CCEI's articulation partners, and has received college credit recommendations by the National College Credit Recommendation Service (National CCRS), which has more than 1,500 schools willing to consider college credit recommendations. Contact Admissions at 1.800.499.9907, or visit the ChildCare Education Institute website for more information or to enroll online.

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