ChildCare Education Institute November Newsletter
Family Child Care Programs  
In This Issue...
The Essential Role of Family Child Care
National Association for Family Child Care
What is Unique About Halloween in Family Child Care?
Supporting Quality in Home-Based Child Care, Final Brief
CCEI Introduces CDA Credential Renewal Certificate in Spanish
Child Care Providers Complete OVER 1,300,500 Hours of Online Professional Development with CCEI
Annual Training Subscriptions - Individual + Center-Based Options
CDA, Director, & Early Childhood Credential Coursework

The Essential Role of Family Child Care            

 

Everyone in the early childhood education industry, from early care providers and elementary school teachers to researchers and policymakers, should be aware of the major role family child care plays in America's educational landscape. Furthermore, it is important for early childhood educators to consider family care providers as partners rather than competitors.  

 

Nearly half of young children spend some time in the family care setting, including many who are also enrolled in a regular, full-time center or school. Over three-quarters of households in which the mother works full time rely on family care at least some of the time, and at least 8-out-of-10 mothers employed part-time use family care while they are at work. No matter what, family care providers will continue to play a major role in the early education of young children throughout the United States.

 

There are over 300,000 licensed family care centers in the United States. In addition, there are hundreds of thousands of unlicensed providers. Being "unlicensed" does not mean that these providers are in some way illegal or illegitimate. In most states, licensing rules only kick in once the caregiver-child ratio meets a certain threshold, usually around 1:6, but as low as 1:4 in some states. Those who care for only 2 or 3 children and those who care for a few relatives (known as "kith and kin care") are normally exempt from most licensing rules.  

 

Licensing standards are intended to promote safe, high-quality family child care, but it is impossible for regulators to provide close scrutiny to so many licensed let alone unlicensed providers. Many family care providers want to provide high-quality care, and many certainly do, but they all face some unique challenges:

 

  • Most work on a very tight budget, with average income around $18,000.
  • They work with multiage groups. Providing optimal care and supervision for an infant, a couple of toddlers, and a couple preschool-age children is very challenging and demanding.
  • While many early childhood professionals know how hard it can be to get parents involved in the program, family care providers usually have very close relationships from the get-go, since they are often neighbors, close friends, or relatives. Such close relationships can lead to all sorts of conflicts and complications that can negatively impact care.
  • Professionally, family care providers often feel isolated or out of touch and must work extra hard to keep up with the latest education trends and best practices. They are unlikely to have easy access to high-quality training or a local professional/support network.

The early childhood education industry can and should provide more support and encouragement to family care providers. They should be thought of as partners rather than as competitors. Family care providers can be a great source of referrals, as it is common for parents to seek group-care settings as children approach kindergarten.  

 

If you work in a group-care center, what can you do to reach out and support your local family care providers? First, find out who they are by asking parents. Invite them to training workshops or to an informational session on professional development. Don't forget to let them know that CCEI offers a wide range of relevant coursework, including ADM102: Family Care Basics, not to mention a comprehensive Family Child Care certificate program. And if you are a family care provider, then you must already know about CCEI. Reach out to other early care providers in your area (including the big centers) and see what support and guidance they might be willing to offer. In the end, we all want a community of safe, healthy, happy children!

Volume 9, Issue 11

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National Association for Family Child Care
 

The Mission of the National Association for Family Child Care is to promote quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care. 

 

The National Association for Family Child Care is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care.

 

The goals of the Association are:

  • To strengthen state and local associations as the primary support system for individual family child care providers.
  • To promote a professional accreditation program which recognizes and encourages quality care for children.
  • To represent family child care providers by advocating for their needs and collaborating with other organizations.
  • To promote the diversity of the family child care profession through training, state and local associations, public education, and Board Membership.

View Article

Article Courtesy of NAFCC.org
What is Unique About Halloween in Family Child Care?

It's the one day of the year that potential clients are knocking on your door! 

 

Halloween is a wonderful opportunity for you to promote your program. Parents with young children are walking down your street!

 

Although the child knocking on your door may not need child care, parents of young children know other parents of young children. Therefore, you want to use Halloween as an opportunity to spread positive word of mouth about your program.  

 

View Article

Article Courtesy of TomCopelandBlog.com

Supporting Quality in Home-Based Child Care, Final Brief
By: Diane Paulsell, Toni Porter, and Gretchen Kirby

Home-based child care - regulated family child care and child care provided by family, friends, and neighbors who are legally exempt from regulation - accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States. Researchers estimate that more than 40 percent of all children under age 5 receive care in these settings, although the proportions of children in home-based child care vary by study.  

 

View Article

Article Courtesy of FamilyFriendAndNeighbor.org

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CCEI Introduces CDA Credential Renewal Certificate in Spanish

CCEI is proud to announce the introduction of the Spanish version of the CDA Credential Renewal Certificate to the catalog of online certificate programs of study.

The CCEI CDA Credential Renewal Certificate provides 45 clock-hours of professional development required by the Council for Professional Recognition in order to renew the National CDA Credential. The program focuses on the six CDA Competency Standards established by The Council for Professional Recognition. In addition, the CDA Credential Renewal Certificate features updated coursework in environment and curriculum, guidance and discipline, professionalism, and more.

   

Child Care Providers Complete OVER 1,300,500 Hours of Online Professional Development with CCEI

CCEI is proud to announce that its students have completed more than 1,300,500 professional development hours and over 6,100 certificate programs online!

For nearly ten years, CCEI has provided quality online child care training coursework to the early childhood education industry. Students continue to appreciate the competency-based, self-paced coursework conveniently available from anywhere they have Internet access. Organizations and individuals across the country choose CCEI for its professional development courses and certificate programs to continue education and satisfy requirements. View the certificate catalog for the full list. 

   

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Individual Professional Development Subscriptions for only $99 per year!  
CCEI offers over 100 IACET CEU-awarded online child care training courses that meet continuing education requirements. CCEI has professional development offerings in English and Spanish, and courses are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year from any computer with Internet access.
 
Center-Based Subscriptions 
Center-Based Subscriptions are a great way for directors to manage and administer continuing education for staff members. CCEI's Center-Based Subscriptions, available for small and large centers, allow directors to provide training for as little as $20 per teacher for the entire year!
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Online CDA Coursework
CCEI's Online CDA Certificate programs of study meet the clock-hour training requirement of The Council for Professional Recognition, which is needed in order to apply for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. CCEI's CDA Certificate programs focus on the six CDA Competency Goals established by The Council and contain the required hours in each of the eight specified content areas.

Online Director Programs
CCEI offers several online programs for directors including the Online Director's Certificate and
Director's Certificate Renewal, Georgia Director's Certificate, Texas Director's Certificate and Texas Director's Certificate Renewal, and Florida Director's Certificate Renewal. These programs provide the professional development required for early childhood professionals seeking to further their skills and knowledge in the management of a child care center. Each student receives support from an Education Coach (EC) and CCEI's Customer Support Help Desk.

CCEI Early Childhood Credential

The CCEI Early Childhood Credential (ECC) is designed to give a basic framework of early childhood theory and application through online content-based coursework, reading assignments, practical application exercises, essays, parent interviews, classroom observation and oral and written exams. The instructional units and the 180 hours of coursework cover major topics in early childhood education including the Principles of Child Growth and Development; Safe, Healthy Environments; Social and Emotional Development; Motor, Language, and Cognitive Development; Principles of Child Assessment; Program Management, Families, and Professionalism. The credential awards 18 IACET CEUs, and is recognized by NAEYC to meet a part of the Alternative Pathways for directors to achieve educational qualifications. The ECC is a clear pathway toward higher education and raising the knowledge and skills of the early education workforce. Holders of the CCEI Early Childhood Credential can be considered qualified for Head Start positions that require a minimum of a CDA or other certificate. Graduates of CCEI's Early Childhood Credential (ECC) will have met all training, portfolio, and observation requirements of the national CDA Credential and only need to complete the Council's exam at a PearsonVue testing center to finalize the CDA Credential application process.The ECC is an expanded program that incorporates the other CDA required elements such as the formal observation and portfolio creation.

 

CCEI coursework is eligible for college credit through articulation with one of CCEI's articulation partners, and has received college credit recommendations by the National College Credit Recommendation Service (National CCRS), which has more than 1,500 schools willing to consider college credit recommendations. Contact Admissions at 1.800.499.9907, or visit the ChildCare Education Institute website for more information or to enroll online.

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