It is probably safe to say that we have all taken science classes that taught the Scientific Method. Most of us have used the Scientific Method at some point to structure lab experiments or science fair projects. It is quite likely that some of us continue to use the Scientific Method, even informally, in our lives today.

In case you require a refresher, here are the steps to the Scientific Method:

  1. Make observations
  2. Ask a question
  3. Conduct background research
  4. Make a hypothesis (best guess)
  5. Conduct an experiment to test your hypothesis
  6. Collect (observe) and analyze data or results of the experiment
  7. Report your findings

Conducting experiments that follow the Scientific Method is just one way to introduce these steps to children. Young children may not be able to recall or use the Scientific Method’s steps in order. However, early childhood is a great time to introduce the steps of the Scientific Method and practice the skills in informal ways.

The activity ideas we share in this month’s newsletter will help strengthen different skills such as:

  • Making observations
  • Asking questions
  • Gathering information
  • Making predictions
  • Testing and experimenting
  • Representing or sharing results

Sometimes these skills can be practiced in isolation, but it is more common for two or more of these skills to be used during one activity. For example, observation skills will be practiced during most of the activity ideas we share. Keeping this in mind, note that we have grouped activity ideas together by skill for organizational purposes only.

For the article Making Observations, CLICK HERE

For the article Asking Questions & Gathering Information, CLICK HERE

For the article Making Predictions, CLICK HERE

For the article Experimenting & Sharing Results, CLICK HERE